Letters from Famous Personalities
S. N. Sriramadesikan :: Official Website::
 
1.SHRI V. V. GIRI
(President of India 1969-1974)
[Delivered the following speech during his release of the Sanskrit Translation of Patthu-Pattu (Sangam Lite rature) by Sri S. N. Srirama Desikan, under the auspices of the South Indian Sanskrit Association, at Sringeri Jagadguru Pravachana Mandiram, Mylapore, Madras on 16th February 1973]


2.Extract of speech by Shrimati Saraiwathi Giri
Wife V.V. GIRI (President of India- 1969-1974)

3.Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMY AYYAR
Annamalianagar P.O
Vice-Chancellor (South India)
Annamalai University
19-10-1964


4.DR. SAMPURNANAND
Raj Bhavan
(Governor, Rajasthan)
Jaipur
19-10-1964.


5.DR. K.N. KATJU
Allahabad,
(Former Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh)
19-10-1964


6.SRI C. R. PATTABHIRAMAN
Information & Broadcasting
Deputy Minister
India 15-10-1964.
Madras (Camp).

7.DR. B. R. SARMA,
Tirupati
Director, Kendriva Sanskrit Vidyapeetha,
19-10-64.

8.Dr. K. M. MUNSHI
Chowpatty Road
B.A., LL.B., D.LITT., LL.D.,
Bombay-7
President
19th Oct. 1964.
Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.


9.DR. S. RADHAKRISHNAN
Rashtrapathi Bhavan
President of India
New Delhi
24th Oct. 1964.

10.DR. SUNITI KUMAR CHATTERJI,
Office:
National Professor of
National Library Campus
India in Humanities
Belvedere
Calcutta-27
PHONE: 4553I9
8th January, 1968.


11.Dr. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO,
Uttar Pradesh
Governor of Uttar Pradesh
April 24, 1961


12.Prabbudas B. PATWARI
Raj Bhavan,
Governor of Tamil Nadu
Madras-600 022,
16th August, 1977.


13.K. K. SHAH
RAJ BHAVAN
GOVERNOR OF TAMILNADU
Madras-22
20th November, 1972


14.K. R. SRINIVASA IYENGAR
91, Kutchery Road,
Vice-President,
Mylapore, Madras-4
Sahitya Academy, New Delhi
20th November, 1972.

15.K.R. SRINIVASA IYENGAR
Matri Bhavan
Formerly Vice-Chancellor
152, Kutchery Road
Andhra University and
Mylapore, Madras
Vice-President Sehitya Academy,
8-03-1981
New Delhi.


16.U. P. Government s Award for Author s work

17.V. V. GIRI
Governor of Kerala,
19th April, 1961.


18.Dr. B. Ramakrishna Rao,
Governor s Camp,
(Governor of Uttar Pradesh)
Uttar Pradesh
April, 24, 1961
.

19.Sri V.V. GIRI,
Kerala Governor s Camp,
(Governor of Kerala)
MADRAS,
19th April, 1961.


20.Sri M. PATANJALI SASTRI,
Krishna Vihar,
Chairman,
Luz, Mylapore,
Central Sanskrit Board
Madras, May 23, 1961.

21.Tarkarnava Pandita Ratna
25, Nathamuni Street,
Sri Uttamur
T. Nagar,
T. Viraraghavacharya, Madras-17
(Holder of the President s Award in Sanskrit)


22.M. ATHANASSAYANAM AYYANGAR
Speaker, Lok Sabha.
Tel. address:
"LokaSabha"
20, Akbar Road, New Delhi- 11
Madras,
October, 21 1961

23.M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGAR
Bihar Governor s Camp,
Governor of Bihar
Ranchi, June 28/29, 1962


24.Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMI AIYAR
DELISLE,
OOTACAMUND
December 9, 1961.


25.Dr. C. D. DESHMUKH
32, Aurangzeb Road,
New Delhi.
December 5, 1961.


26.R. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO, M.P.
A-89, BARKATPURA
Ex. Governor, U.P
V.P. HYDERABAD-DECCAN
July 19th, 1962.


27.T. L. VENKATARAMA AIYAR B.A., B.L.,
New Delhi,
CHAIRMAN LAW COMMISSION.
1-8-1961.


28.SRI PRAKASA,
Raj Bhavan,
Governor of Bombay
March 30th, 1957.


29.T. M. NARAYANASWAMY PILLAI, M.A., B.L.,
Crawford Colony,
Formerly Vice-Chancellor,
Thiruchirapalli-1
Annamalai University
30-08-1961.


30.UMASHANKAR JOSHI
"Setu"
President,
26, Sardar Patel Nagar,
Sahithya Academy,
Ahmedabad-380006
New Delhi


31.B. D. JATTI
New Delhi
Vice-President of India
March 15th, 1979

32.THIRUGNANASAMBANDHAN, M 4.L.T.
MADRAS-5
Chief Professor of Sanskrit and comparative Philology
12-04-1971
Presidency College


33.Dr. K. KUNJUNNI RAJAH, M.A., Ph.D.
MADRAS.5
Professor of Sanskrit,
29-3- 1971
University of Madras


34.Dr. V. V. Giri,
Vice-President of India
13th Jan., 1968.


35.Dr. SUNIT1 KUMAR CHATTERJI,
National Professor of India in Humanities
Calcutta, 8th Jan., 1968

36.Dr. C. D. DESHMUKH.
Hyderabad,
28th Feb., 1968.


37.PANDITARAJA Tirupathi,
D. T. TATACHARYA, M.O.L.,
Retired Reader in Sanskrit,
Sree Venkateswara Oriental Research Institute
Jan. 11, 1968

38.Kamba Ramayanam (in Sanskrit)
Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMY AYYAR,
Vice. Chancellor,
Annamalai University
Oct. 19, 1964

39.Dr. S. RADHAKRISHNAN, Rashtrapathi Bhavan,
President of India
New Delhi,
Oct. 24, 1964


40.Dr. K. M. MUNSHI,
President, Bharathiya Vidya Bhavan,
Bombay, Oct. 19, 1964

41.Dr. SUNITI KUMAR CHATTERJI,
National Professor of India in Humanities , Calcutta
July 12, 1965

42.Dr. SAMPURNATHANAND, Jaipur,
(Governor, Rajasthan)
Oct. 19, 1964


43.Dr. K. N. KATJU, Allahabad,
(Former Chief Minister of M.P)
Oct. 19, 1964


44.Sri C. R. PATTABHIRAMAN,
Dated Oct. 19, 1964Deputy Minister
Oct. 19, 1964


45.Dr. B. R. SARMA. Tirupathi,
Director, Kendriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth
Oct. 19, 1964


46.Dr. S. M. KATRE, Poona,
Director, Deccan College of Post-graduate and
Research Institute
Sept. 15, 1965


47.V. V. GIRI,
Governor of Kerala,
13-8- 63


48.T. L. VENKATARAMA AIYAR, Madras
(R&D. Supreme Court Judge)
27-8-1963.


49.S. GOVINDARAJULU, Tirupathi,
Vice-Chancellor, Sri Venkateswara University
27-8-1963.


50.Vemana Padyamulu in Sanskrit Slokas with Tamil Translation
M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGR Ranchi,
(Governor of Bihar) June 28/29, 1962.


51.Dr. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO, i. Hyderabad,
Ex-Governor, U.P. July 19, 1962.


52.Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMI AIYAR
December 9, 1961


53.Mr. M. PATANJALI SASTRI,
Former Chief Justice of India and Chairman, Central Sanskrit Board,
(On the occasion of the release of Tirukkural in Sanskrit on 31-12-1951)


54.Dr. C. D. DESHMUKH, New Delhi,December 5, 1961.

55.M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGAR New Delhi,
Speaker, Lok Sabha. October21, 1961.


56.T. L. VENKATARAMA ATYAR, New Delhi,
Chairman, Law Commission 1-8-1961.


57.T.M. NARAYANASWAMI P1LLAI,
Formerly Vice-Chancellor, Annamalai University
Trichy, 30-8-61.


58.Dr. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO, Governor of UP
Lucknow, 24-4-61.


59.Sri M. PATANJALI SASTRI,
Chairman, Central Sanskrit Board,
Madras, May 23, 1961.


60.Dr. SUNITI KUMAR CHATTERJI,
President, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi.
National Professor of India in Humanities,
Calcutta, 11-3-71


61.SRI SRI PRAKASA,
Raj Bhavan,
Governor of Bombay,
March 30, 1957.


62.V. V. GIRl,
Governor of Kerala,
April 19, 1961.


EXTRACTS FROM THE OPINIONS BY MANY 0F THE LEADING PERSONALITIES ABOUT THE AUTHOR AND HIS WORKS

SHRI V. V. GIRI
(President of India 1969-1974)
[Delivered the following speech during his release of the Sanskrit Translation of Patthu-Pattu (Sangam Lite rature) by Sri S. N. Srirama Desikan, under the auspices of the South Indian Sanskrit Association, at Sringeri Jagadguru Pravachana Mandiram, Mylapore, Madras on 16th February 1973]


EXTRACT OF THE SPEECH
"It is a great pleasure for me to be here today and release the Sanskrit translation of the Tamil classic "C PATTHU.PATTU" by my friend Shri Srirama Desikan. His service to the cause of literature is well known. As you are all aware, he is the author of several well-known translations and commentaries of Tamil and Sanskrit classics. In fact, similarly, Desikan whom I have known for a long time is a master of many languages, especially Sanskrit and Telugu. He referred to Thirupathi. By translating Tamil classics into Sanskrit, Shri Srirama Desikan has rendered yeoman s service to the cause of national integration. I am convinced that it is by dedicated labour of writers that we can bring about great understanding between different linguistic groups and promote concord and amity among them. After all, language is the vehicle of human thought and the purpose of language is to cement human relationships. Language should never be used to divide human beings into hostile groups. The need of the hour is to build bridges of understanding and I commend to the reading public Shri Desikan s latest offering. I always felt then and I still feel that the children should study Sanskrit from their infancy and one day, I hope, the language controversy will disappear and Sanskrit language will be the language of the country…… I once again commend my friend, Shri Srirama Desikan s latest book "PATTHU-PATTU" in Sanskrit. I wish him many more years of fruitful literary life."
Mrs. Saraswathi Giri, wife of the President of India, who was present on the occasion, expressed her appreciation of the author s intimate knowledge of several Indian languages and her devotion to him as a Guru even though he was younger to her in age.

Extract of speech by Shrimati Saraiwathi Giri
Wife V.V. GIRI (President of India- 1969-1974)

With his rich experience, Sri Desikan has accompushed this noble task in a highly commendable manner. He is known to me and to the Rashtrapathi for several years. Your Rashtrapathi had participated in the function connected with the release of his earlier works. So we may appreciate the great contribution that our friend, Sri Rama Desikan has been making towards national integration and understanding by his labours Non- Tamilians in particular should be grateful to this author for giving them an opening into the great treasures of Tamil literature, through the medium of simple, elegant and chaste Sanskrit. It would be of great profit and interest to draw parallels between the thoughts of Avvaiyar and the ethical writers in other languages of India. It gives me some consolation to find that Tamil writers themselves have recognised the value of Sri Desikan s works.
My parents gave tue the name Saraswathi. Perhaps this may be the reason for the privilege I have today in participating in the function. I am also an "Avvaipatti" in the sense i: compose poems. This may also be the reason.
Although Desikan is younger than I, I adore him as my Desikan-the preceptor. Kumaran, as a boy came to Avvai as her Guru. Therefore, I am not blessing him. I pray to God to bestow on him long life and prosperity. My Guru has honoured me by dedicating this book to me. Let us consider the work as a unique treasure.
We will never forget Avvaiyar s Notes in life

Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMY AYYAR
Annamalianagar P.O
Vice-Chancellor (South India)
Annamalai University
19-10-1964

FOREWORD
Dear Sri SN. Sriramadesikan,
For several years you have laboured strenuously in the field of research and critical scholarship. You have also acquired considerable experience as Editor of a number of Sanskrit classics and specially distinguished yourself by  your redaction into Sanskrit of famous Tamil classics like Tirukkural and Thiruppavai as well as your versions of the poems of Subramania Bharathi, (your accomplishment as comprehensive linguists have helped you in this matter). You have also produced a Sanskrit adaptation of Vemana s Padayams.
You have now essayed a similar task with reference to Kambar s great version of the Ramayana pointing out the changes and deviations introduced by Kambar into the Valmiki original. As you have pointed out, Kambar, with the background of the Adi Kavya, also utilised the Ramayana story for exhibiting his marvellous skill of narration and description of natural scenery and of human emotions. As I have already observed with reference to your previous efforts you evince in all your work a remarkable verbal felicity enabling you to capture the spirit of the original masterpiece.
My best wishes,
(Sd.) C. P. Ramaswami Aiyar.

INTRODUCTION
DR. SAMPURNANAND
Raj Bhavan
(Governor, Rajasthan)
Jaipur
19-10-1964.

Dear Sri Siromani,
I have gone through the Sanskrit translation of the Kamba Ramayana sent by you. Having heard a good deal about the excellence of this work, I was naturally very anxious to read it. I am told that a translation in Hind is available but so far I have not been able to secure a copy. Your translation seems to me to be well-executed. The language is simple but chaste and eloquent. Not knowing Tamil, I cannot say how far the translation agrees with the original but there is no reason for me to believe that you have deviated very far from the main text. Your introductory notes are useful. We know that in some places Tulsidas has varied the story as given by Valmiki. From your notes, it appears that Kambar has done the same. The reason, I believe, is also the same. Both the authors have tried to gloss over what appeared to them to be certain gross aspects .of the original story.
(Sd.) Sampurnanand

INTRODUCTION
DR. K.N. KATJU
Allahabad,
(Former Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh)
19-10-1964


Ramayana has played a1most a miraculous part in the national history of Hinduism in India. For countless ages it has moulded the character and destiny of Hindus. Valmiki s Ramayana in Sanskrit has led the race. But versions of his wonderful story as told by Valmiki in regional languages like Kamba Ramayana in Tamil and Hindi Ramayana by Tulsidas have moved and influenced countless generations of Hindu folk living in the rural and urban areas in Southern and Northern India. Now that by God s blessing India has become free and independent and one solid whole, it would be in the national interest if all these famous versions were translated in Sanskrit-our great national language- and thus become available to the nation at large. I beg to offer my warm felicitations to Pandit S. N. Srirama Desikan for translating Kamba Ramayana in Sanskrit. By his effort, Kambar s great treatise becomes the heritage of India. I am sure it will be widely read and appreciated. Tulsidas Ramayana is equally famous in Northern India. I am sure its Sanskrit translation will be equally appreciated and welcomed.
I have read the English portion of your book with great interest. It has been revealing to me.
With best wishes,
(Sd.) K. N. Katju

INTRODUCTION
SRI C. R. PATTABHIRAMAN
Information & Broadcasting
Deputy Minister
India
15-10-1964.
Madras (Camp).

Sri S. N. Sriramadesikan, who is a Nyaya Siromani from the Tirupati Sanskrit College, is well known to South Indian scholars. He has frequently reviewed religious and philosophical books for the Hindu and other leading newspapers in South India. He is one of the acknowledged research scholars of South India who has contributed a number of learned articles to journals. He is rendering notable service to Tamil by rendering many of the classic books in that ancient language into Sanskrit. He has already translated the Thiruppavai in attractive slokas and has also translated the Tirukkural which is usually referred to as the Tamil Veda. He has also translated Vemana Kavi s Padyams into Sanskrit. He has also translated the famous national songs of Subramania Bharati into Sanskrit.
In the present work which is a rendering it Sanskrit of the Kamba Ramayana the author has worked hard to preserve the beauty of Kambar. There are many passages where this ancient Tamil poet has deviated from and sometimes improved upon Valmiki. It is only in Kambar that we have the detailed descriptions of the personality of Sri Rama and it is again in Kamba Ramayana that we have the episode of Sabari the great devotee who tastes every fruit before offering it to the Lord so that He could have the best. I have heard from great Bhagavathars the story wherein Sri Rama was asked whether a certain episode in Ramayana was correct or not. Sri Rama is supposed to have replied saying that if Valmiki had said so, that must be taken as the truth.
The translations of Sri Rama Desikan arc bound to be as invaluable as they are likely to be interesting to readers in the North, many of whom do not have an inkling of the worth of the great classics in Tamil. It has been truly stated that there is no equal to the devotional literature of Tamil Nadu. By getting acquainted with these with the help of translations, our compatriots in the North can gain an integrated culture. This is a sure means of national integration. I wish Sri Sri Rama Desikan all success.
(Sd.) C. R. Pattabhiraman.

INTRODUCTION
DR. B. R. SARMA,
Tirupati
Director, Kendriva Sanskrit Vidyapeetha,
19-10-64.

Shri S. N. Sriramadesikan who has already translated into Sanskrit Sri Andal s Thiruppavai, Tiruvalluvar s Tirukkural and Bharatiar s poems has translated now a good number of select verses (about 440) from the Bala Kanda of Sri Kamba Ramayana, a Tamil epic of great merit. It is a well known fact that the translation of a work is more difficult than writing an original work, for in writing the original the ideas spring up in the mind of the author with the words expressive of them. In doing the translation, the idea is there already hi a particular language and the translation job is to clothe it in a language, perhaps with its genius totally alien to the source language. Many a translation has lost the charm of the original because the translation often makes-a Săbdănuvăda-i.e., literal translation, not the Bhävanuvăda-catching the spirit of the original. It is the difficult task of a translator that he should retain the beauty of the original and Put the source-idea in a language entirely different. Considering these points and applying them to ili present work, one can safely say that the author of the Sanskrit Kamba Ramayana has done his job neatly. It is really a great service to Kamban himself that he has been now brought to a wider circle of non-Tamil scholars of Sanskrit who, but for the present work, will not be able to understand Kamban. Sri Srirama Desikan s attempt deserves very encouragement and it is also hoped that he would bring out the other Kandas also very soon.
(Sd.) B. R. Sarma.

INTRODUCTION
Dr. K. M. MUNSHI
Chowpatty Road
B.A., LL.B., D.LITT., LL.D.,
Bombay-7
President
19th Oct. 1964.
Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.

I am glad that Pandit S. N. Sriramadesikan, Siromani has brought out Kamba Ramayanam-Bala Kandam, in Sanskrit. Kamba Ramavanam is popular in the South as Tulsidas  Ramayanam is in the North and I am glad that the author has made this epic accessible to the Sanskrit knowing public in the whole of India.
(Sd.) K. M. Munshi.

INTRODUCTION
DR. S. RADHAKRISHNAN
Rashtrapathi Bhavan
President of India
New Delhi
24th Oct. 1964.

MESSAGE
Dear Sri Sriramadesikan,
You are doing valuable work. These books you are publishing will I hope spread spiritual enlightenment and comfort.
(Sd.) S. Radhakrishnan.

INTRODUCTION
DR. SUNITI KUMAR CHATTERJI,
Office:
National Professor of
National Library Campus
India in Humanities
Belvedere
Calcutta-27
PHONE: 4553I9
8th January, 1968.

I am very happy to find that Pandit Sri S. N. Srirama Desikan is bringing out a Sanskrit prose translation of the famous Old Tamil Classic, "Silappathikaram". Sri Srirama Desikan ha already distinguished himself by his Sanskrit writings, both original and translation, and he has to his credit some of the most important classics in South Indian languages, Tamil and Telugu, in very readable Sanskrit translations. His translation of 380 verses of the "Tirukkural"" completing the Arattuppal section of this great work is already before us, besides his Sanskrit Version of Sri Andal s Thiruppavai and the Balakanda portion of Kambar s Tamil Ramayana and of some of the more important works of Subramanva Bharathi s poems in Tamil. He has further done in Sanskrit slokas nearly 4 hundred padyas of the Telugu poet, Vemana. He has thus quite an impressive mass of work for the integration of the literary and cultural life of India through Sanskrit.
The "Silappathikaram" is one of the most beautiful works in Indian literature and stands out as the finest original Epic Kavya in Old Tamil, apart from the longer poems with their special Old Tamil character which we find in the "Patthupattu". There are at least two English translations of this work that I know of and recently the well-known Czechoslovak scholar of  Tamil, Professor Kamil Zvelebi has brought out a fine verse translation of this work in his mother tongue Czech. Professor Srirama Desikan s version of the first Kanda, the Pukar Kandam or the first section of this poem is quite opportune, as it is being released during the month of the II International Conference-Seminar of Tamil Studies, which is now being held with such great enthusiasm as well as scholarship in Madras. He has given us a simple and easily readable prose rendering in Sanskrit of the different sub-sections, and it should be helpful for those who did not know Tamil from outside Tamizhakam to understand and appreciate this fine work. There is a very beautiful account of the glorious and gorgeous civilisation of the ancient Tamil country during the first centuries after Christ. The main characters, the hero Kovalan and the heroine Kannagi has been drawn with consummate grace and sympathy. If Kovalan is a spoilt child of rich parents, still more spoilt by the love of his wife, and proves to be a fickle minded young man; his weakness is more than compensated by his tragic death. Kannagi is one of the sweetest examples of faithful wives in any literature, and it is the intensity of her grief at the tragedy of her innocent husband being put to death without trial that brings about a sort of retribution upon the king and his people for their share, although unwilling and unknowing, in the death of an innocent man.
I myself have dipped into his translation, and I expect to find it exceedingly helpful.
As I said in my preliminary observations while presiding at a plenary meeting of the International Conference- Seminar of Tamil Studies in Madras the other day, Sanskrit has its own importance side by side with Tamil, which of course is of supreme value in the Tamil country; and I consider this work to be a demonstration of the slogan with which I ended my observations-
Samskruthamum Vazhga,
Tamizhum Vazhga.
"Glory to Sanskrit, and Glory also to Tamil"
(Sd.) Suniti Kumar Chatterji.
FOREWORD
Dr. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO,
Uttar Pradesh
Governor of Uttar Pradesh
April 24, 1961


An attempt has been made by Sriramadesikachari to clothe it in simple Sanskrit. which is very faithful to the original Tamil composition. The author is a wel1know Sanskrit Pandit, who has been serving the cause of Sanskrit  earning for some years. He is a fluent speaker in Sanskrit.
I am glad that "Thiruppavai" has been translated by him into Sanskrit. I gladly it roduce this leautifu1 poem to readers outside Tamilnadu and I do hope that it will rouse interest among lovers of Sanskrit in other languages of the South like Tamil, which has an inexhaustible e store of great literature.
(Sd.) Dr. B. Ramakrishna Rao
Prabbudas B. PATWARI
Raj Bhavan,
Governor of Tamil Nadu
Madras-600 022,
16th August, 1977.
FOREWORD

Tamil Literature reflects the culture and civilization of South India from a distant past in our history; and the earliest extant literature of the Tamils is called Sangam literature. One can notice in it a free inter-mingling of Sanskrit words and references to puranas and ithihasas. The Sangam classics reveal the high degree of learning among all sections of the people, irrespective of caste, community, faith or status. Further, more than fifty poetesses figure in these classics. They raised above all differences, and contributed to national unity through literature.
To the Sangam period belongs the wnrk known as "Ettutokai"-Eight Anthologies-and  Paripadal" is one of them. "Paripadal" contains 22 verses-6 devoted to Vishnu,
8 to Subrahmanya and 8 to the Vaigai river composed by 13 poets. I believe they were set to tunes in those days and music lends a special charm to them.
Pandit Sri S N. Srirama Desikan has presented in this book a Sanskrit translation of "Paripadal . He has already translated similar Tamil works into Sanskrit, and this is one more welcome addition to his achievements. The translation is in simple and lucid style. I warmly congratulate him on the unique service he is rendering in this field.
Sanskrit knowing people who want to dive deep into treasures of the Tamil language can do so through such translations, and this is how we must promote national Integration through languages. I welcome Pandiji s efforts in this direction, and wish him continued success.
PRABHUDAS, B. PATWARI

FOREWORD
K. K. SHAH
RAJ BHAVAN
GOVERNOR OF TAMILNADU
Madras-22
20th November, 1972


I have pleasure in introducing to the public this  Sanskrit version of the Tamil work "Thirumurugatruppadai" and "Mullaippattu" brought out by Pandit S. N. Sriram Desikan. To translate a work from one language into another is a task by no means easy as it requires mastery of the two languages. Pandit Srirama Desikan possesses this qualification. A research officer of the Kendriya Sanskrit Vidyapith, Tirupati, Pandit Srirama Desikan was the recipient of the coveted President s award for Sanskrit in 1971. His earlier works include similar Sanskrit renderings of Thiruppavai, Thirukkural, Silappadikaram and Avvaiyar s works. I admire the chaste Sanskrit in the present work.
Tamil literature has a hoary past. The classical works of the glorious Sangam Age (300 B.C. to 100 A.D.) contain a collection of ten works called "Patthuppattu", "Thirumurugatruppadal" of the "Atruppadai" group is the first and "Mullaipattu" is fifth of these ten. "Thirumurugatruppada" is in praise of Lord Mruga. Variously known as Kartikeya, Shanmukha, Skanda, etc., Muruga is the most popular God worshipped in Tamil Nadu and is a source of inspiration to many a poet and saint. The circumstances leading to the composition cc this work are interesting: The poet of this work, Nakkeerar, was confined in a cave by a demon who had already collected and concealed 999 men and had been waiting for the 1,000th man to devour the whole lot. The poet found himself to be the 1,000th man. Before the demon s evil design could materilaise, Nakkeerar so fervently prayed to Lord Muruga that He (the lord) came to his rescue and destroyed the demon. All were thus saved by His infinite Grace. This poetical composition is therefore credited with the power of saving devotees of Lord Muruga from any danger or difficulty. As Nakkeerar shows the way to others to get 1is Grace, the thematic classification "Atruppadai" is justified.
Those who know Sanskrit alone or those who know both Tamil and Sanskrit are bound to read this work with interest and profit. The description of Lord Muruga and His famous Six holy Resorts to which a pilgrimage is commonly made stirs piety in every heart and affords spiritual solace.
The "Mullaippattu", forming the second part o this  work, refers to a love-torn lady who was anxiously expecting return of her husband from the battlefield. "Mullai-thinai" means pastoral land, one of five classifications of land mentioned in Tamil literature. This work describes the rainy season, Vishnu - the presiding deity of the region cows and calves. Ancient customs and manners of the people of the region are also dealt with in a graphic way.
I congratulate Pandit Srirama Desikan on the good job he has done, and I am sure his labours will have been amply rewarded if this work gains a wider circulation.
K. K. SHAH

INTRODUCTION
K. R. SRINIVASA IYENGAR
91, Kutchery Road,
Vice-President,
Mylapore, Madras-4
Sahitya Academy, New Delhi
20th November, 1972.


A new effort at translation from Tamil into Sanskrit by Sri S. N. Srirama Desikan needs no commendation, especially from one like me who has but small knowledge of classical Tamil and even less of Sanskrit. His past adventures in translation have been the means of opening a useful Suez Canal between Tamil and Sanskrit, and between Tamil Nadu and the rest of India; and the present endeavour is no less welcome.
Of the two pieces here put into Sanskrit, "Tirumurugaruppadai" is one of the five "guide-poems" in Patthuppattu -Ten Songs and indeed the greatest of them all. Here a Bhakta who has won his way to God realisation (God in the form of Muruga) shows the way to a strayed and puzzled wanderer in life-it may be you or me-singing His glories, describing the six sacred spots where He could be worshipped, teaching the aspirant the word of prayer, and giving assurance of the Divine response. By sleight of hand as it were, the guide-poem technique is charged with significance and the song becomes a magical manual of Bhakti Yoga.
The second piece, Mullaippattu is in celebration of idyllic human love of holy wedded love, the pangs of separation felt by the queen when her husband is away or the battle-field, and the joy old imminent reunion.
Sri Srirama Desikan s choice of these two out of the ten brings out the two-fold best-the sacred and the secular, the mystical and the human sublime in Pathuppattu. This is no mean service to the cause of national integration I  is so dear to us, and 1 hope this book will reach a wide and appreciative audience.
K. R. SRINIVASA IYENGAR.

K.R. SRINIVASA IYENGAR
Matri Bhavan
Formerly Vice-Chancellor
152, Kutchery Road
Andhra University and
Mylapore, Madras
Vice-President Sehitya Academy,
8-03-1981
New Delhi.


FOREWORD
I do not understand why a seasoned scholar and translator like Sri S N Srirama Desikan, whose Sanskrit renderings of Tamil classics like Pathupattu, Ettuthogal, Silappadhikaram, Tirukkural, Tiruppavai, the Ramayana of Kamban, Avvaiyar s Ethical Exhortations, as also of Subramanya Bharati s poems, have. in the past won prestigious recognition and wide acclaim-I do not understand why Sri Srirama Desikan wants me, with my small Tamil and less Sanskrit, to write a Foreword to his latest adventure of launching yet another Tamil classics the Naaladiyaar with a lilting verse translation in Sanskrit, a readable and lucid English prose paraphrase, a helpful Tamil explication, and a scholarly and critical preface in English.
The only reason for asking me to write a Foreword could be that this might be the means of my undertaking some necessary reading and educating myself a little, at least to the extent of being able to appreciate and applaud Sri Srirama Desikan s meritorious work of initiating and sustaining a diffusion of Tamil literature and culture over the whole of India.
The Naaladiyaar is a collection of 400 quatrains in the popular venba metre, arranged (following the example of Tirukkural) under the three broad divisions of Aram (Dharma), Porul (Artha) and Inbam (Kama), and subdivided (again. as in the Kural) into groups often quatrains. But whereas the Kural is an integrated orchestration covering the whole are of the Good Life, the Naaladiyaar is an assortment of verses by different writers, but generally concerned with the minutiae of living a blame- less and moral life, and preparing for the coming liberation. The modalities of the arrangement, if they reduce to some order the massive content of the 400 quatrains; also introduce a measure of unavoidable artificiality. If the Kural is an exquisitely interwoven fabric (almost like Indra s fabulous net of pearls), the Naaladiyaar is more of a well-filled basket of fruits and vegetables. There is perhaps, all the difference between the interpenetrative complex unity of the  bootstrap  and the variegated opulence of the prearranged building-blocks!.
It has been remarked that the abundance of Ethical works in classical Tamil was probably the result of the prevailing low standard of private and pubic morality at the time. This would be too simplistic and puerile a judgment. It was because, alongside of the general run of average humanity, there were also conspicuous examples of human excellence of purity, probity and nobility, austere living and high thinking, the poets were able so readily to limn the contours of the Ideal life here and now to exhort the commonality, to aspire likewise and to achieve the righteous and purposive life.
There is then, the problem of the genesis or the etiology of the Naaladiyaar. How about the tradition that 8000 Jain saints fled Madurai, leaving behind one quatrain each, and when these were floated down the Vaigai, only these 400 safely reached the shore; or, perhaps, were the quatrains the surviving fall out of the struggle between Saiva saint, Tirti Jnana  Sambandar, and the Jam ascetics? But whatever the origins, it is clear that Padumanar made this anthology of 400 quatrains from a much larger number then o in currency, and imposed on these the present sweeping three-arched pattern with its forty spans of exhortation and admonition.
The central thrust of the argument of course is an ascetic denial of all self indulgence and surplus age, a remorseless emphasis on the transience of terrestrial life, and the need to prepare for what lies beyond, by practicing a regimen of charity, purity, eternity and good works. The poets of the Naaladiyaar antho1ogy have a proper abhorrence of the deadly sins, and especially of lusting after another s wire or feeling infatuated with the mercenary harlots. On the positive side, there are the virtues of bounty, honour, learning truthfulness, forbearance perseverance, goodness, greatness and freedom from anger. This steep and narrow way of sreyas is to be preferred to the seductive, Self- defeating, self -destroying path of sreyas. In the Kural, we are shown the spiral of, ascent from the householder to the renunciant, and so on to the sage, the elect. In the Naaladiyaar, we are warned of the dangers of the precipitous descent from the bare and life of the renunciant to the self controlled life of the honest householder-and, then, down, among the self indulgent and self-doomed.
This quintessential dialectic apart, the Naaladiyaar fascinates by the scintillating beauty and finish, wisdom and good sense, of a large number of individual quatrains. Like the sacred Kural, the Naaladiyaar too has gone into the currency of everyday Tamil speech, imparting to it terseness and strength, parallelism and contrast, and a perennial piquancy. Here are two or three quatrains, fairly characteristic of the Naaladiyaar:
The elect among mankind ponder o er
The transience of youth, beauty, wealth, strength,
Life itself, and learn to sunder all ties,
And prepare in time for liberation. (53)
It s best to opt for an ascetic s life,
And second-best to wed a cultured wife;
But basest of all would be, for money,
To serve the utterly worthless and vile. (364)
The wise spend their time perusing good books
The average live within their means;
But those that pine for what they don t possess
And feel sore, are despicable indeed. (365)
And so on. It is instructive to start with a verse or two, linger long repeating and ruminating, then pass on to the next, and the next, till a whole ethical discourse builds itself for one s edification. And the Naaladiyaar is fail of such riches of shrewd observation, apt similitude, wise counsel and wholesome admonition.
It now only remains to compliment Sri Srirama Desikan on the missionary zeal with which he is disseminating Tamil culture through his Sanskrit and English translations to a wide national and international audience.
(Sd) K.R. Srinivasa Iyengar

Shri K. K. Shah, Governor of Tamil Nadu, presiding on the occasion, referred to the mastery of the author in the two Indian languages - Tamil and Sanskrit.
The President, Shri Giri presented a Silver Kuthuvilakku to the author given by the South Indian Sanskrit Association. The President, Shri Giri also presented a
Ponnadai (Silk Shawl) given to the author by the Jagadguru H. H. Sankaracharya of Sringeri Saracla Peetbam.
U. P. Government s Award for Author s work
The Avvaiyar s Niti works in Sanskrit by Sri S. N. Srirama Desikan has been awarded a cash award of Rs. 500/ as being one of the best books in Sanskrit, by the Uttar Pradesh Government for the year 1973.

V. V. GIRI
Governor of Kerala,
19th April, 1961.

I have known Shri Srirama Desikan for a long time. He is a great Sanskrit scholar. He is rendering great service to the country by his works and publications. There are only a few Sanskrit scholars of the type in the country.
(Sd.) V. V. Girl

FOREWORD
Dr. B. Ramakrishna Rao,
Governor s Camp,
(Governor of Uttar Pradesh)
Uttar Pradesh
April, 24, 1961.


I am exceedingly happy to introduce this translation into Sanskrit of the exquisite poem "Thiruppavai" by Sri S.N. Srirama Desikachari of Madras. "Thiruppavai" is a famous devotional poem composed by Andal, otherwise known as Godadevi, who was the foster-daughter of Shri Vishnuchittar or Perialwar, who is one of the famous twelve Shrivaishnava Saints called Alwars in the South. The Alwars and the Nayanmars have been famous Vaishnavaite and Shaivite saints in the South who were responsible for propagating the bhakti cult, which has made the people intensely devotional in their lives. The large number of temples in the South and the millions of people who are devoted to worship in the temples, their maintenance, construction, improvement etc., is an eloquent testimony to the background of the bhakti cult, which is popular throughout India, but particularly so in the South.
This lovely poem has been translated into Telugu and English and probably into other languages. An attempt has been made by Sriramadesikachari to clothe it in simple Sanskrit, which is very faithful to the original Tamil composition. The author is a well-known Sanskrit Pandit, who has been serving the cause of Sanskrit earning for some years. He is a fluent speaker in Sanskrit and has to his credit some compositions both in Tamil which is his mother-tongue and also in Sanskrit. He has translated many Sanskrit dramas like Mudrarakshasam, Avimarakam, Malathi-Madhavam etc., into Tamil. He has also published many articles in Tamil on Sankrit writers and Sanskrit literature. As the Secretary of the South Indian Sanskrit Pandits Association for six years, He conducted many conferences and public meetings and organized free Sanskrit classes for its propagation. I am glad that "Thiruppavai" has been translated by him into Sanskrit. I gladly introduce this beautiful poem to readers outside Tamilnadu and I do hope that it will rouse interest among lovers of Sanskrit in other languages of the South like Tamil, which has an inexhaustible store of great literature.
B. Ramakrishna Rao.

Sri V.V. GIRI,
Kerala Governor s Camp,
(Governor of Kerala)
MADRAS,
19th April, 1961.


I am very happy to receive a presentation of the Sanskrit version of the poems written by Andal (Tiruppavai) and these thirty poems are a very valuable contribution to Tamil Literature Shri Srirama Desikan s rendering of these poems into Sanskrit will help the whole of India to know the significance and the spirit underlying these poems and he has done a distinct service to that great Andal in getting these circulated throughout India in Sanskrit. Sri Srirama Desikan is a Sanskrit scholar of very great eminence and he is a Nyaya Siromani of the Madras University. He is a gentleman of character, integrity, ability and knowledge. I wish him every success in his trying to render his humble service to the country.
V.V. Giri.

Sri M. PATANJALI SASTRI,
Krishna Vihar,
Chairman,
Luz, Mylapore,
Central Sanskrit Board
Madras, May 23, 1961.


The rendering in Sanskrit verse of the inspired outpourings of Sri Andal in the celebrated Tamil lyric  Tiruppavai" is a venturesome undertaking, but Pandit Srirama Desikan has carried it through with notable success.
Using the Sragdhara and Sardoola Vikriditam metres, the longest known to Sanskrit prosody, the Pandit has been able to compress each pasuram of the poem within the framework of a single sloka, but not without squeezing out in the process some of the ideas here and there in the poem (e. g. pasurams 28 and 29). Such instances are, however, few, and, on the whole, the stanzas written in elegant and flowing Sanskrit keep commendably close to the original.
The Avatarika (also in verse) gives a brief account of Sri Andal and her manobhava in composing the poem.
I congratulate the Pandit on his fine performance.

M. PATANJALI SASTRI.
Tarkarnava Pandita Ratna
25, Nathamuni Street,
Sri Uttamur
T. Nagar,
T. Viraraghavacharya, Madras-17
(Holder of the President s Award in Sanskrit)

I have gone through Pandit Sri Rama Desikan s Sanskrit Tiruppavai verses. The well- known Tamil Divya Prabandha named Tiruppavai by the Great Andal Devi has been rendered into Sanskrit by Sri Rama Desikan, who has studied under me the whole Nyaya Siromani Course when I was the Senior Nyaya Professor in the Tirupati Venkateswara Sanskrit College. He passed his Nyaya Siromani Examination in 1942. He has diligently studied the Nyaya Sastra for four years and got some awards during his studentship. He possesses the teaching capacity in Nyaya and other subjects like Sahitya. He has studied Vedanta and written some articles in Sanskrit and Tamil. He has translated into Tamil some Sanskrit works also. His ability to speak fluently and to write verses in Sanskrit will be appreciated by every Sanskrit lover. THIS SANSKRIT TRANSLATION OF THE TIRUPPAVAI PRABANDHA will clearly show his profound knowledge in Sahitya. His knowledge in Nyaya Sastra, his character, and his endeavour to study the Nyaya works critically, and to analyse the facts stated in them are to be appreciated. He deserves all encouragement.
T. Viraraghavcacharya.

M. ATHANASSAYANAM AYYANGAR
Speaker, Lok Sabha.
Tel. address:
"LokaSabha"
20, Akbar Road, New Delhi- 11
Madras,
October, 21 1961

FOREWARD
I had pleasure going of through in rendering the easy Sanskrit anushtup verses, the idea underlying the various pieces from Thirukkural undertaken by Sri Sriramadesikan. Hitherto we have been noticing renderings of various Sanskrit works such as Ramayana, Mahabharata and the Puranas into various languages of India including Tamil, but corresponding renderings of original works in Tamil and other languages into Sanskrit is rarely attempted.
Thirukkural has been translated into various languages of the world. It is a masterpiece describing the three out of four objectives of life - "dharma"or duty, "artha"or wealth and "kama"or love or happiness. The original is terse and every word therefore is full of important meaning. Of the various commentaries on it, the important one is that of Parimelazhaghr.
The greatness of a rendering lies in its being read without reference to the original, and it must be as good as original. Thirukkural is terse and it is difficult to bring out its import fully its similar short slokas. Sri Sriramadesikan has in some places elaborated upon the original work following the commentary of Parimelazhagar.
I understand that Sriman U. Ve. Uttamur Veeraragha  vachariarSwami has gone through critically the rendering and suggested improvements. Sri Sriratna Desikan has gladly carried out those suggestions in his work. Sri Srirarna Desikan is a good Sanskrit scholar. Early in his life, he passed Nyaya Shirornani from the Madras University through the Sri Venkateswara Sanskrit College, Tirupati. He is as good at Tamil as he is at Sanskrit. He has rendered in easy Tamil prose seven Sanskrit dramas on the lines of Lamb s Tales from Shakespeare. He has also rendered into Sanskrit Sri Andal s Thiruppavai.
Sri Srirama Desikan has rendered as a first step 380 verses of Thirukkural comprising verses from "Arathuppal". He proposes to render the other portions into Sanskrit like wise. I am sure that his work will be very well received by the public. The work is fit to be even prescribed for students in Sanskrit schools and colleges for the early classes.
I wish that Sri Srirama Desikan will undertake similar works of rendering good works from Sanskrit to Tamil and vice versa, so that those knowing only one language may have the advantages of reading the works of literature in both languages. Sri Srirama Desikan is a young scholar who deserves encouragement. He is now working on a scholarship from the Government of India on research.

M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGAR
M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGAR
Bihar Governor s Camp,
Governor of Bihar
Ranchi, June 28/29, 1962


FOREWORD
I have gone through Pandita SriRamaDesikan s translation of "VEMANA PA"YA
in Sanskrit slokas with Tamil translation. They are in easy flowing style in Sanskrit. Of course his Tamil rendering is equally good. He has already rendered in Sanskrit slokas Tiruvalluvar s "TIRUKKURAL" . I am extremely glad to note that he has developed an easy style and has brought out the meaning of the original, both in the Tirukkural and Vemana s verses. Sometimes it is more difficult to translate than to compose verses in the original. In the first case the translator has to confine himself to the meaning of the original and carry out its spirit and substance in the rendering. Sri Sri Rama Desikan has translated the four paddhatis (viz. Murkha-Dambhika - Vidvat - Artha paddhatis) in Vemana s verses so far. I hope he will be able to render the other section also in easy Sanskrit verses. I congratulate him on his enterprise and wish him all success.

M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGAR
Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMI AIYAR
DELISLE,
OOTACAMUND
December 9, 1961.


INTRODUCTION
Tiruvalluvar s Tirukkural is a unique masterpiece. Its inimitable terseness, its combination of literary grace and philosophic and psychological ubt1ety, its gracious and yet penetrating outlook on life s problems and its intensely practical approach make this series of aphorisms a source of delight to the mind and a guide and solace for the soul. The Tamil muse has from the Sangam period, while owing a great deal to Sanskritic ideology and conception, followed an individual path, and developed distinctive types of literature and speculation. The Tirukkural bears comparison with the highest efforts of the Greeks, the French and the English in the domain of Epigrams and maxims, and with the aphorisms of the Ramayana, Mahabharata and Bhartruhari but in economy of expression allied with profundity of thought it is supreme.
It is no small task to translate such a chef - d oeuvre into Sanskrit a language whose formation and intrinsic genius are different from those of Tamil though marvellous in its own spheres and unapprochab1e in its verbal exact- ness and poetic amplitude.
Sri Srirama Desikan has essayed and performed this task and his translation of ARATHUPPAL (Dharma Kandaha) deserves warm commendation. His mastery of easy and fluent Sanskrit has enabled him to follow the original in diction and sentiment with a faithfulness which is truly admirable. In his translation, for instance, of verses 77, 111, 325, 335 and 338 he shows dexterity of adaptation which demonstrates his expert knowledge of  both the languages .
The author has already produced Tamil synopses of seven celebrated Sanskrit dramas and his rendering of Sri ANDAL S TIRUPPAVAT in complicated Sanskrit metre was a tour de force which has earned the praise of scholars and publicists. This translation and adaptation of the Kural  is however the Pandit s best work and the volume is a notable addition to modern Sanskrit literature.

C. P. RAMASWAMI AIYAR
Dr. C. D. DESHMUKH
32, Aurangzeb Road,
New Delhi.
December 5, 1961.


I have gone through the translation with great interest and appreciation. The idea of bringing out a translation in Sanskrit of the immortal classic of Tiruvalluvar is a very
good one and I think that it has been carried out most satisfactorily. I am sure that it will lead to an India-wide recognition of the wisdom stored in Tirukkural.
With best wishes,
C. D. DESHMUKH

R. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO, M.P.
A-89, BARKATPURA
Ex. Governor, U.P
V.P. HYDERABAD-DECCAN
July 19th, 1962.


INTRODUCTION
I had the pleasure of reading the Sanskrit translation of Vemana s poems by Pandit S. N. Sri Ramadesikan. The great Saint Poet Vemana is  very popular in Andhra Pradesh  and his Sataka mainly deals with moral subjects. The main object of his poems is to correct the defects prevailing in contemporary society. He has also composed poems on Bhakti and Vairagya. While the poet has written keeping in view the society of his tune the book as a whole is useful to people of all ages and of all parts of the country. The book contains eternal moral truths which read like aphorisms.
Sage Vemana is one of the four foremost Bhakta Kavis who had devoted whole of their lives for writing on subjects of Bhakti, Gnana and Vairagya. . They are  Pothana ,  Thyagaraja ,  Ramadas  and  Vemana . All the four of them have enriched Telugu literature and their writings are extremely popular. Pandit Sriramadesikan is well versed in Sanskrit, Tamil and Telugu and is a good poet himself. has also translated Tirukkural of Tamil into Sanskrit. While many Sanskrit works have been translated into regional languages the rich literature of Tami1, Telugu and Kannada and such other regional language s is yet to be translated into Sanskrit so that it may reach scholars on au All India level. As a matter of fact, translation into Sanskrit of such books as Vemana s poems will be itself in introducing to the scholars all over the world the wisdom enshrined in these literatures.
I am extremely happy that "Vemana s Poems" has been translated by him into Sanskrit and Tamil. I am confident that this beautiful poem will be a feast to both Tamil and Sanskrit readers. I do hope that it will rouse interest among lovers of Sanskrit and Tamil in other languages of the South like Telugu, which has an inexhaustible store of great literature.
I congratulate him on his venture and wish him all success.

R. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO, M.P
FOREWORD
T. L. VENKATARAMA AIYAR B.A., B.L.,
New Delhi,
CHAIRMAN LAW COMMISSION.
1-8-1961.


In this work Sri Srirama Desikan presents to the Tamil reading public a narration of seven stories taken from Sanskrit dramas, on the lines of Lamb s Tales from Shakespeare. The author is a great Sanskrit scholar and a Nyaya Siromani of the Madras University. He is besides well versed in Tamil literature, and has rendered "Thiruppavai" of Sri Andal in Sanskrit.
It is claimed, and rightly, on behalf of Tamil hat it is a language independent of Sanskrit, and that it has a literature which is as rich as it is ancient. That however does not mean that it has grown in isolation from the rest of India. It has at all times been realised by great minds of the Tamil country that true culture knows of no linguistic bounds, and that a language must, if it is to survive, absorb the best that has been thought and said in other languages. In this view they have always turned to the neighbouring language of Sanskrit, which has a rich heritage of religion and philosophy, and of art and literature, and drawn freely from it and thus enriched Tamil. This process has gone on for some two thousand years so much so the current Tamil thought and literature can truly be said to be an amalgam of the indigenous Dravidian and imported Aryan cultures. Indeed the process of integration has been so complete that it will be difficult to separate the one element from the other. It is the s power to assimilate that has enabled Tamil to survive as an independent language through the ages.
The influence of Sanskrit on the evolution of Tamil culture is most marked in the region of sacred literature, Saivite and Vaishnavite. It has indeed been said of the "Divya Prabandhams" that they expound the truths of the Upanishads for the people of the Tamil Nad in their own language. Likewise, in poetry, one has only to turn to the work of the greatest of the Tamil poets, Kamban, to see the influence of Sanskrit. Kamban avowedly drew his inspiration from Valmiki and other Sanskrit poets who had written on the story of the Ramayana, but what he drew became alchemised in passing through his imagination into something new and resplendent, and herein lies the greatness of Kamban.
When however, we turn to drama, tile tale is somewhat different. We do not find any great dramatic literature of antiquity in Tamil. This is surprising as "Natakam" is one of the three categories making up the "Mut-Tamil" (Three-Tamil), and the surprise is all the greater when it is remembered that drama occupies the pride of place in Sanskrit literature and is unequalled for its richness, either in quality or quantity. That it must have exerted considerable influence over Tamil literature is clear from the fact that the very word "Natakam" is taken from Samskrit, and it is not improbable that there was, in days of old, dramatic literature in Tamil which, however, would appear to have been lost. In recent times there has been a revival of drama in Tamil, and that must be a matter for satisfaction to all lovers of Tamil.
The present publication must, in this context, be doubly welcome. It seeks to familiarise the Tamil-reading public with the masterpieces of the Sanskrit stage. In this work are narrated stories which form the theme of seven dramas written by different authors among whom are Bhasa , Katidasa and Bhavabhuti. The stories cover a wide range of topics, Puranic, historical and social. The language is simple, lucid and such as to impress all readers. Sri Srirama Desikan deserves the gratitude of all lovers of Tamil for this useful and instructive publication.
T. L. Venkatarama Aiyar
SRI PRAKASA,
Raj Bhavan,
Governor of Bombay
March 30th, 1957.


Pandit S. N. Srirama Desikan was very well known to me when I was Governor of Madras. I was much struck at the fluency with which he spoke Sanskrit and the knowledge he had of its literature. It was always a pleasure to meet him and to realise how with a little effort, Sanskrit, though regarded a very difficult language, can be mastered and used with comparative ease.
I had also the pleasure of introducing him to the president, Dr. Rajendra Prasad and the Governor of Uttar Pradesh, Shri K. M. Munshi, who were both much pleased to meet him and to know of his attainments.
SRI PRAKASA.

T. M. NARAYANASWAMY PILLAI, M.A., B.L.,
Crawford Colony,
Formerly Vice-Chancellor,
Thiruchirapalli-1
Annamalai University
30-08-1961.


Sri S. N. Sriramadesikan is a well-known Sanskrit scholar, now doing research under an assignment of the Government of India. He has to his credit many Sanskrit books which have won the appreciation of eminent Sanskrit Scholars like Sri Sri Prakasa, Governor of Maharashtra, Sri V. V. Giri, Governor of Kerala, and Sri B. Ramakrishna Rao, Governor of Uttar Pradesh.
Not only is Sri Desican a scholar in Sanskrit but he is also a scholar in Tamil. His scholarship in both the languages has made him realise how in the long course of history the two great independent languages of our country, viz., Sanskrit and Tamil have been influenced, each by the other. In the literature of both the languages we have a rich heritage which has moulded and shaped our culture and civilisation.
Recently Sri Desikan has translated into Sanskrit the beautiful Tamil Poem  Andal s  Thiruppavai . With the laudable object of introducing Sanskrit classics to the Tamil Public he had published years ago articles in the Tamil Dailies, giving the gist of the dramatic stories by the celebrated Sanskrit poets. Now he is collecting these articles and publishing them together in a book entitled  Seven Dramatic Stories . Not only is Sri Desikan a scholar in Sanskrit but he is also a scholar in Tamil.
The choice of the original authors is excellent; the list includes immortals like Kalidasa and Basan who have won a place among the poets of the world; the stories have been written in easy prose which can be understood by the common man. These stories will serve a useful purpose in enabling the Tamils to have a glimpse of the drama and poetry in Sanskrit and thereby enlarge their vision.
Sri S. N. Sri Rama Desikan has laid the Tamil Public under a debt of gratitude by his praiseworthy service.
T. M. NARAYANASWAMY PILLAI

UMASHANKAR JOSHI
"Setu"
President,
26, Sardar Patel Nagar,
Sahithya Academy,
Ahmedabad-380006
New Delhi

FOREWORD
Tirukkural is perhaps the most outstanding Tamil work to be translated into many Indian as well as foreign languages.
The work derives its name from  Kural  (Tamil word for  small ), i.e., a small Tamil metre, Virtham, in which it is written and  Tiru , an honorific title. It is divided into three parts and consists of 133 chapters of ten Kurals each. Tirukkural could be freely rendered
as the revered verses  or  the great epigrammatic stanzas .
Known as the  Tamil Veda , Tirukkural presents the distilled wisdom of a culture. The overall theme is the "Art of living". The stanzas are musings on man s behaviour by Tiruvalluvar, a saintly householder, who flourished between the first and the third century, BC.
The three parts deal with Dharma, Artha and Kama rignteousness, worldly objects and desire. Even when a poet like Bhartrihari picks up stray poetic moments and produces three Shatakas,-three sequences of hundred 4 verses, we find that they also deal with worldly behaviour, erotic desire and asceticism leading to righteousness.
Furthermore, such collections of Subhashitas - apt utterances-often contain some verses which are borrowed from other writers or are based on popular adages. Bhartrihari has a verse (1-61), which is also found in Shakuntalam (V. 12) with a slight variation. N& wonder, the study of works like Tirukkural also throws light on the tendency to adopt or adapt material from elsewhere.
As Tirukkural aims at making available the quintessence of the accumulated wisdom of a culture, its author is likely to assimilate freely from all material that is known to him. To see the influence of Jainism, Buddhism, the Smritis, etc. or to trace a stanza, a line or a half-line to some Sanskrit source would no doubt be an interesting and rewarding exercise, but it can be overdone also. Sri Srirama Desikan s Sanskrit translation of Tirukkural may, in a sense, help to establish the distinctly separate identity of the work.
Years ago, leafing through old files of the Indian Antiquary, I came across the Epigrams of Goethe rendered into Sanskrit. On reading them I almost asked myself in which Sanskrit work I had already come across the stanzas or something similar to them. It only showed how universal Goethe s epigrammatic wisdom was. Perhaps it showed something more also: the capacity of the Sanskrit language and the Subhashita-form to present a wise utterance in a cryptic and authentic style, which one evinces again and again while going through Sri Desikan s rendering of the Kurals in chaste and chiselled Anushtup stanzas.
Tirukkural is designed more as a manual of human conduct than as a poem. Each part has a certain number of neatly devised chapters, on various topics, of ten stanzas each. Again, each stanza is sufficient in Itself, a maxim of practical wisdom, easy to be committed to memory) Even while the author would be working as a sort of a compiler, his originality could assert itself in pressing the material into the service of his new work,-in making each stanza sparkle with a freshness of Its own while it contributed to the total context. In fact, the stamp of Tiruvalluvar s genius can be seen on many a Kural. Even though the obvious intention is didactic, quite a few Kurals scintillate with the beauty of utterance, a rich suggestiveness, a metaphor, an unexpected turn of Idea or expression, as even a few specimens would indicate:
The wise ones hail as a country only that, which is… deserving of praise even of foreigners. … (11-352)
It is asked what is grievous as poverty, the answer can be only "Poverty". …. (11-661)
Smiling countenance and behaviour will not make for friendship. Only when the heart blossoms, can true friendship be formed. …. (11-406)
Asking of persons, who will not even dream of deceitful words, is tantamount to making gifts to others. …. (11-674)
No pain is caused when fools chance to separate from us. So, In a way, friendship with fools Is a matter of delight. …. (11-459)
Ah, God and ignoble persons form a class in achieving successfully whatever  they desire, with none to question them.  …(1l-693)
Every one, who, like me, does not know Tamil, is sure to enjoy Sri Srirama Desikan s Sanskrit and English renderings, which do not fall to convey the pithiness and felicity of articulation of the Master.
UMASHANKAR JOSHI Ahmedabad:
2-6- 1978

B. D. JATTI
New Delhi
Vice-President of India
March 15th, 1979

FOREWORD
Pandit S. N. Srirama Desikan has distinguished himself by his writings in Sanskrit, and particularly by his excellent translations of the Tamil Classics. He has brought priceless literary and philosophical works by Avvaiyar, Andal, Tiruvalluvar, Kambar, Ilango Adihal, Subramanya Bharathi and other savants within the reach of the Sanskrit-knowing public. His knowledge of Telugu has enabled him to translate Vemana s famous Niti verses into melifluous Sanskrit. The Pandit has been rightly praised not only for his profound scholarship but also for building bridges between Sanskrit and Indian vernaculars through his fine translations.
Valluvar s Tirukkural is a Tamil classic believed to be nearly two thousand years old. It is a treatise in verse which has been classed among the precious classics of world literature. The entire work is in three parts: arampal or virtue, porutpal or wealth and worldly affairs and kamattupal or love. Thus it is a complete guide to the householder and saint, the politician and administrator as we1l as the person in love. It propounds the principles of right conduct for the guidance of all classes of people. It is also a treatise on worldly affairs including the complexities of statecraft. The third part deals exhaustively with human involvement and all the nuances of mutual relationship and emotional reactions between man and woman. Thus in this great work Valluvar has shed the light of his wisdom on all matters, ethical, spiritual, social and personal with which man is concerned and in which he is involved. Tirukkural may well be regarded as guide, friend and philosopher to the traveller on the path of life. Its appeal is universal and beyond the limitation of time and place. Valluvar s insight into human nature and human affairs is uncanny, and his reflections and advice on every situation, temporal and otherwise, reveal not only a pragmatic wisdom but an always stable ethical and spiritual basis. This is evident from the well known verse of arampal which declares:-
"The alphabet  lives  on the basis of the first letter  A ; likewise, all the world
movable and immovable is sustained by the faith in God."
The truth of the statement that great minds think alike finds support in the startling similarity in exposition between Tiruvalluvar in his Kural and Basaveshwara in his Vachanas despite the fact that they were separated in time by over a thousand years. Both were seers akin to each other in thought and outlook. Both were seers who perceived the underlying truth through almost identical experience. The identity of thought between Thiruvalluvar and Basaveshwara is seen in their common praise of the Lord. It is evident in their condemnation of external show of piety and of hoarded wealth. It is again underscored in their call for the cultivation of the virtues of mercy, kindness, truthfulness, friendship of the worthy and pious and restraint in speech. It is emphasised in their exhortation to abstain from untruth, anger, hate and killing. Both Tiruvalluvar and Basaveshwara show a practical approach to the problems of life but are steadfast in upholding moral standards and idealism of a high order. Both the saints possessed a spirit transcending dogma and denomination. Both of them uttered eternal verities in their own language, employing an idiom which could reach the heart of the common folk.
The Kural is a work which has been translated into many languages of the world, and has engaged the best minds in assessing its value to mankind. Vidwan Srirama Desikan has rendered a great service to humanity in translating Tirukkural in to Sanskrit and English and thus bringing it before a larger public. I hope the Vidwan will continue his worthy literary endeavours in Sanskrit and other languages in which he is so erudite.
(Sd) B. D. JATTI
THIRUGNANASAMBANDHAN, M 4.L.T.
MADRAS-5
Chief Professor of Sanskrit and comparative Philology
12-04-1971
Presidency College

Pandit Sri S. N. Sri Rain Desikan is a versatile scholar in Sanskrit and possesses a certain linguistic skill in other an languages like Tamil, Telugu and Hindi and has been able to translate from Tamil and Telugu into Sanskrit and vice versa. Certain sections of the well known works in Tamil and Telugu like Tirukkural, Silappadikaram, Kamba Ramayanam, Bharathis poems, Vemana Padyamulu etc., have already been rendered by him into elegant Sanskrit verses. He has now com out with a translation into Sanskrit of some of the didactic Tamil Poems of Avvaiyar. Every home in Tamil Nadu knows the celebrated name of the legendary poet ho was not only a guide and philosopher held in high esteem by the kings and laymen of her times but who by her immortal Tamil works Athichudi, Konraivendan, Moothurai and Nalvazhi has continued to be a practical guide for the righteous life of men and women of all times.
To capture the nuances of ideas especially of ethical or philosophical content couched in a rich language like Tamil particularly of the epigrammatic variety and express it in a language with a genus of its own is a difficult task and there may be room for improvement here and there. It may however be said that the author Sri S. N. Sri Rama Desikan has made a sincere attempt in translating the above four works in flowing Sanskrit of epigrammatic and metrical variety following the pattern of the original and has succeeded by and large in capturing the spirit of the original.
It is a piece of good service that he has been render g, already recognised by men of consequence, in making available to Sanskrit-knowing people in the whole of India and the richness and variety of the ancient Tamil language that has been in existence for more than two thousand years This is one mere step in the direction of Nation integration. It is hoped that these works w11 receive the same measure of response as his earlier ones did from the lovers 0f Sanskrit
(Sd.) P. THIRUGNANASAMBANDHAN

Dr. K. KUNJUNNI RAJAH, M.A., Ph.D.
MADRAS.5
Professor of Sanskrit,
29-3- 1971
University of Madras


Sanskrit and Tamil are the two great ancient languages of India with very rich, varied and original literatures; while the great treasures contained in the Sanskrit literature have been to a great extent distributed to the rest of India through translations, adaptations and imitations, most of the original and precious thoughts contained in the Tamil language have not yet permeated to the other literatures of India.
Pandit S. N. Sri Ramadesikan, who is well known to the lovers of Sanskrit by his Sanskrit renderings of specimens from classical Tamil Works, deserves encouragement and recognition for his enthusiastic attempt to introduce the rich treasures of the ancient Tamil literature to the whole nation by translating them into S3nskrit, the common classical language 0f India. -1is translation is in chaste and idiomatic Sanskrit and is faithful to the ideas contained in the original, even in cases where it is not literal.
(Sd.) K. KUNJUNNI RAJAH

The elegance and suggestiveness of Sanskrit is such that no thought or emotion runs the risk of losing its loftiness or subtlety, when clothed in it. There are scholars in every part of India who can appreciate works of literary merit in Sanskrit. Moreover, Sanskrit is international in the sense that there are at least a few in every corner of the world who can understand it. The attempt, therefore to present Bharathiar in Sanskrit, is commendable.
The pieces selected here are representative by their impressiveness and popularity. They are capable of introducing the genius of Bharathiar works to those who can understand Sanskrit. The collection of songs called "Kannan Pattu" is a fine instance of the blending of lyricism and romanticism, while breathing the spirit of renaissance felt by the county. The essays under the title "Gnanaratham" show Bharathiar in his real spirit. The selection of passages for translations has been very wise.
This is not the first attempt of Sri Srirama Desikan to translate pieces from South Indian languages into Sanskrit. His translations of  Thirukkural ,  Vemana  and  Thiruppavai  have won appreciation from the readers.
I am very happy to introduce the nice work to the public and offer my felicitations to the translation for opening one more window to those who can understand Sanskrit.
(Sd) S. GOVINDARAJULU

SILAPPADIKARAM (in Sanskrit)
Dr. V. V. Giri,
Vice-President of India
13th Jan., 1968.


…By the present translation of the first Kanda the Pukar Kandam - of the epic into Sanskrit Sri S. N. Sri Rama Desikan has rendered a very useful service to Sanskrit scholars and students . . . This is one step forward in the attempt to integrate the cultural unity of India by making the literature of one part of the country available to the rest of it.
…The Silappadikaram portrays the Tamil society of the early centuries of the Christian era; and the extent to which the Tamil culture presents its integration with and absorption of North Indian culture can be clearly seen in it. …This pioneer attempt of Mr. Sri Rama Desikan, I hope, will spearhead the efforts of Sanskritists in presenting such integrated literary productions from the South.
As a good student of Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu and English, he has already translated into Sanskrit, among others, The Tirukkural of Valluvar, the poems of Bharatiyar and the Tiruppavai of Andal and Kamba Ramayana, all from Tamil. In the present attempt of Sri Rama Desikan we see the Sanskrit language, literally allowing itself to be used in the most appropriate manner, displaying the skilled artist in his work of art.
The translation of the Silappadikaram into Sanskrit will, I believe, render a very useful service in presenting Tamil culture to all Sanskritists in the world who are not scholars of Tamil literature. This can also be utilised as a text book in the non-Tamilian area schools for the spread of the culture of the Tamils.

Dr. SUNIT1 KUMAR CHATTERJI,
National Professor of India in Humanities
Calcutta, 8th Jan., 1968

I am very happy to find that Pandit Sri S.N.SriramaDesikan is bringing out a Sanskrit prose translation of the famous Old Tamil Classic "Silappadikaram "… His translation of 330 verses of the Thirukkural completing the Arattupal section of this great work is already before us besides his Sanskrit version of Sri Andal s Tiruppavai and the Balakanda portion of Kambar s Tamil Rarrtayanam and of some of the more important works of Subramanya Bharathi s poems in Tamil. He has further carried in Sanskrit slokas nearly four hundred Padyas of the Telugu Poet, Vemana. He has thus quite an impressive mass of work for the integration of the literary and cultural life of India through Sanskrit. He has given us a simple and easily readable prose rendering in Sanskrit of the different sub-sections, and it should be helpful for those who do not know Tamil from outside Tamizhakam to understand and appreciate this fine work.

Dr. C. D. DESHMUKH.
Hyderabad,
28th Feb., 1968.

Dear Sri Rama Desikan,
I have enjoyed reading the Noopura Kavyam (Pukar Kandam) which you were good enough to send me. The Sanskrit prose style you have adopted is admirable, at once unaffected and elegant.
PANDITARAJA Tirupathi,

D. T. TATACHARYA, M.O.L.,
Retired Reader in Sanskrit,
Sree Venkateswara Oriental Research Institute
Jan. 11, 1968


Silappadikaram is a standard work in Tamil and its contents deserve to be known and studied even by all people who do not know Tamil. Pandit Sri Rama Desikan is now helping those people by publishing this NoopuraKavyam the style of which is natural, easy and at the same time grand. Prose writers in Sanskrit are rare and those are still rarer who could adopt an unaffected style, as the present author has done. The book deserves to be prescribed as a text for University Examination in the Sanskrit subjects.
Kamba Ramayanam (in Sanskrit)

Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMY AYYAR,
Vice. Chancellor,
Annamalai University
Oct. 19, 1964


Dear Sri S. N. Sri Rama Desikan,
For several years you have laboured strenuously in the fields of research and critical scholorship. You have also acquired considerable experience as Editor of a number of Sanskrit classics As you have pointed out, Kambar, with the background of the Adi Kavya, also utilised the Ramayana story for exhibiting his marvellous skill of narration and description of natural scenery and of human emotions. As I have already observed with reference to your previous efforts you evince in all your work a remarkable verbal felicity enabling you to capture the spirit of the original masterpiece.

Dr. S. RADHAKRISHNAN, Rashtrapathi Bhavan,
President of India
New Delhi,
Oct. 24, 1964


Dear Sri Sri Rama Desikan, You are doing valuable work. These books you are publishing will I hope spread spiritual enlightenment and comfort.

Dr. K. M. MUNSHI,
President, Bharathiya Vidya Bhavan,
Bombay, Oct. 19, 1964


I am glad that Pandit S. N. Sri Rama Desikan, Siromani, has brought out Kamba Ramayanam-BalaKandam, in Sanskrit. Kamba Ramayanam is popular in the South as Tulsidas  Ramayanam is in the North, and I am glad that the author has made this epic accessible to theSanskrit-knowing public in the whole of India.

Dr. SUNITI KUMAR CHATTERJI,
National Professor of India in Humanities , Calcutta
July 12, 1965


Dear Sir,
I have some idea of the poetical beauty of Kambar s version of the Ramayana. I have been exceedingly pleased to note the beautiful style in which you write Sanskrit. You seem to handle the language of the Gods with as much ease as our classical writers, and this shows that Sanskrit forms a true second mother-tongue if not actually the first language for yourself. I shall be very glad if your book receives the encomium which it fully deserves from Sanskrit scholars who really know the language.

Dr. SAMPURNATHANAND, Jaipur,
(Governor, Rajasthan)
Oct. 19, 1964


Dear Sri Siromani,
Your translation of Kamba Ramayanam seems to
be well-executed. The language is simple but chaste and eloquent… Your introductory notes are useful. Both Kamban and Tulasi have tried to gloss over what appeared to them to be certain gross aspects of the original story.

Dr. K. N. KATJU, Allahabad,
(Former Chief Minister of M.P)
Oct. 19, 1964


I beg to offer my warm felicitations to Pandit S. N. Sri Rama Desikan for translating Kamba Ramayana in Sanskrit. By his effort, Kamba s great treatise becomes the heritage of India. I am sure it will be widely read and appreciated. Tulasidas Ramayana is equally famous in Northern India. I am sure its Sanskrit translation will be equally appreciated and welcomed.
I have read the English portion of your book with great interest. It has been revealing to me.

Sri C. R. PATTABHIRAMAN,
Dated Oct. 19, 1964Deputy Minister
Oct. 19, 1964


Sri S. N. Sri Rama Desikan, who is a Nyaya Siromani from the Tirupathi Sanskrit College is well known to South Indian scholars.. .He is rendering notable service to Tamil by rendering many of the classical books in that ancient language into Sanskrit. . . .In the present work whch is a rendering in Sanskrit of the Kamba Ramayanam the author has worked hard to preserve the beauty of Kambar… The translations of Sri Rama Desikan are bound to be as invaluable as they are likely to be interesting to readers in the North many of whom do not have an inkling of the worth of the great classic in Tamil… By getting acquainted with these with the help of translations, our compatriots in the North can gain an integrated culture. This is a sure means of national integration.

Dr. B. R. SARMA. Tirupathi,
Director, Kendriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth
Oct. 19, 1964

The author of the Sanskrit Kamba Ramayana has done his job neatly. It is really a great service to Kamban himself that he has been now brought to a wider circle of non-Tamil scholars of Sanskrit-who, but for the present work, will not be able to understand Kamban. Sri Sri Rama Desikan s attempt deserves every encouragement.

Dr. S. M. KATRE, Poona,
Director, Deccan College of Post-graduate and
Research Institute
Sept. 15, 1965


Dear Pandit Sri Rama Desikan,
While my knowledge of literary Tamil is not adequate, I can still say that your Sanskrit version reads very well, and is an interesting contribution to literature. People accustomed to read only Valmiki s original version should find your rendering a very helpful supplement in order to understand the impact of the Rama Story in the development of Indian literature in general. I congratulate you on your successful translation. Bharathiyar s works in Sanskrit.

V. V. GIRI,
Governor of Kerala,
13-8- 63


The book abounds in numerous instances where the Sanskrit rendering is an exact replica of the original ideas in entirety while at the same time the translation is quite simple to be easily understood by one and all. The author Sri Sri Rama Desikan is known to me for a very long time and has been rendering signal service to the Sanskrit Language, and is also the Secretary of the South Indian Sanskrit Association and as author of some valuable books.
Special mention must be made of the three poems by Bharathiyar-Kannan s Songs, National Songs and Gnanaratham, a short novel in prose, which have been introduced in this work of the author. They are quite suitable to be sung at schools in parades and classes infusing Bhakthi, by the public with a spirit of vigour and valour in defence of the nation, and by adults and all others.

T. L. VENKATARAMA AIYAR, Madras
(R&D. Supreme Court Judge)
27-8-1963.


It is a commendable idea to translate into Sanskrit classical works in the vernaculars. Sri S. N. Sri Rama Desikan has already laid the public under a deep debt of gratitude by translating Tirukkural, Thiruppavai and Vemana in Sanskrit. He deserves to be congratulated for the excellent rendering of Bharathiar s works in easy and elegant Sanskrit. I have no doubt that the work will be welcomed by all admirers of Bharathiar and lovers of Sanskrit.

S. GOVINDARAJULU, Tirupathi,
Vice-Chancellor, Sri Venkateswara University
27-8-1963.


The present volume provides us with a Sanskrit version of chosen pieces of Bharatiyar s poetry and prose for the first time. …The attempt therefore, to present him in Sanskrit, is commendable. The pieces selected here are representative by their impressiveness and popularity. They are capable of introducing the genius of Bharathiar to those who can understand Sanskrit. The collection of songs called  Kannan Pattu  is a fine instance of the blending of lyricism and romanticism while breathing the spirit of renaissance felt by the country. The essays under the title "Gnanaratham" show Bharathiar in his real spirit.
Vemana Padyamulu in Sanskrit Slokas with Tamil Translation

M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGR Ranchi,
(Governor of Bihar) June 28/29, 1962.


I have gone through Pandita Sri Rama Desikan s translations of "VEMANA PADYA" in Sanskrit slokas with Tamil translation. They are in easy flowing style in Sanskrit. Of Course his Tamil rendering is equally good I am extremely glad to note that he has developed an easy style and has brought out the meaning of the original, both in the Tirukkural and Vemana s verses.

Dr. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO, i. Hyderabad,
Ex-Governor, U.P. July 19, 1962.

I had the pleasure of reading the Sanskrit translation of Vemana s poems by Pandit S. N. Sri Rama Desikan of Madras While the poet has written keeping in view the society of his time the book as a whole is useful to people of all ages and of all parts of the country. The book contains eternal moral truths which read like aphorisms…
As a matter of fact, translation into Sanskrit of such books as Vemana s poems will be useful in introducing to the scholars all over the world the wisdom enshrined in These literatures. Pandit Sri Rama Desikan is well versed in both Sanskrit and Telugu and is a good poet himself. He is also well versed in Tamil language and therefore he has not only translated Vemana s poems into Sanskrit verses, but has given a prose translation in Tamil 80 that scholars of Tamil Nadu may also be acquainted with Vemana, the Telugu poet. Attempts like these are most welcome inasmuch as they contribute to a better understanding of the various languages and literatures prevalent in India.
I have read the Sanskrit version of Vemana with the originaIs. The translation is free from all omissions or commissions and true to the original thoughts of Saint Vemana. The language of Sanskrit version is fluent and free and easily understandable even to those whose acquaintance with Sanskrit is not very intimate. I request lovers of Indian culture to patronise the efforts of Pandit Sri Rama Desikan and give an honoured place to this book in the realm of literature. Scholars who are well versed in more than one language can serve a very useful purpose by promoting the intellectual understanding which will be useful in creating the much needed emotional integration of the country.
Thirukkural in Sanskrit

Dr. C. P. RAMASWAMI AIYAR
December 9, 1961

Sri Sri Rama Desikan s translation of thirukkural ARATHUPPAL (Dharma Kanda) deserve warm commendation. His mastery of easy and fluent Sanskrit has enabled him to follow the original in diction and sentiment with a faithfulness which is truly admirable. In his translation, for instance, of verses 77, 325, 335 and 338, he shows a dexterity of adaptation which demonstrates his expert knowledge of both the languages.
This translation and adaptation of the Kural is however the Pandit s best work and the volume is a notable addition to modern Sanskrit literature.

Mr. M. PATANJALI SASTRI,
Former Chief Justice of India and Chairman, Central Sanskrit Board,
(On the occasion of the release of Tirukkural in Sanskrit on 31-12-1951)


…Mr. Patanjali Sastri complimented Mr. Desikan on his excellent translation of the Kural, which itself was written in short sentences. Reading a few passages, he said that the utmost economy of words had been attempted and the exact spirit of the original had been carried over in the Sanskrit translation, even to the extent of following the rhythm in certain cases. The language in the translation, he would say, ran parallel to the original text.
Congratulating the author, Mr. Patanjali Sastri said that he was, in fact, a "path finder" in the matter of translating Tamil works into Sanskrit. A two-way traffic of the kind, was needed, he added, as it would help those in the North to learn and appreciate the treasures contained in Tamil literature. (THE HINDU)

Dr. C. D. DESHMUKH, New Delhi,December 5, 1961
.

I have gone through the translation with great interest and appreciation. The idea of bringing out a translation in Sanskrit of the immortal classic of Tiruvalluvar is a very good one and 1 think that it has been carried out most satisfactorily. I am sure that it will lead to an India-wide recognition of the wisdom stored in Tirukkural.

M. ANANTHASAYANAM AYYANGAR New Delhi,
Speaker, Lok Sabha. October21, 1961.


Sri Sri Rama Desikan has rendered as a first step 380 verses of Tirukkural comprising verses from "Arathuppal "…The work is fit to be even prescribed for students in Sanskrit schools and colleges for the early classes.
I wish that Sri Rama Desikan will undertake similar works of rendering good works from Sanskrit to Tamil and vice versa, so that those knowing only one language may have the advantages of reading the works of literature in the both languages.
"Ezhu Nataka Kathaigal" (Seven Tamil Tales)

T. L. VENKATARAMA ATYAR, New Delhi,
Chairman, Law Commission 1-8-1961.


In this work, Sri Rama Desikan presents to the Tamil reading public a narration of seven stories taken from Sanskrit dramas, on the lines of Lamb s Tales from Shakespeare… Here are narrated stories which form the theme of seven dramas written by different authors among whom are Bhasa, Kalidasasa and Bhavabhuthi. The stories cover a wide range of topics, Pura ic, historical and social. The language is simple, lucid and such as to impress all readers. Sri Sri Rama Desikan deserves the gratitude of all lovers of Tamil for this useful and instructive publication.

T.M. NARAYANASWAMI P1LLAI,
Formerly Vice-Chancellor, Annamalai University
Trichy, 30-8-61.


..Not only is Sri Desikan a scholar in Sanskrit but he is also a scholar in Tamil. His scholarship in both the languages has made him realise how in the long course of history the two great independent languages, of our country, viz. Sanskrit and Tamil have been influenced, each by the other. In the literature of both the languages we have a rich heritage which has moulded and shaped our culture and civilization.
Sri Andal s  Thiruppavai  in Sanskrit Slokas

Dr. B. RAMAKRISHNA RAO, Governor of UP
Lucknow, 24-4-61.


An attempt has been made by Sriramadesikachari to clothe it in simple Sanskrit, which is very faithful to the original Tamil composition. The author is a well- known Sanskrit Pandit, who has been serving the cause of Sanskrit learning for some years. He is a fluent speaker in Sanskrit.
I am glad that "Tiruppavai" has been translated by him into Sanskrit. I gladly introduce this beautiful poem to readers outside Tamil Nadu and I do hope that it will rouse interest among lovers of Sanskrit in other languages of the South like Tamil, which has an inexhaustible store of great literature.

Sri M. PATANJALI SASTRI,
Chairman, Central Sanskrit Board,
Madras, May 23, 1961.

The rendering in Sanskrit verse of the inspired outpourings of Sri Andal in the celebrated Tamil lyric "Tirupavai" is a venturesome undertaking. But Pandit Sri Rama Desikan has carried it through with notable success.
On the whole, the stanzas written in elegant and flowing Sanskrit keep commendably close to the original.
Avvaiyar Nithi Works in Sanskrit

Dr. SUNITI KUMAR CHATTERJI,
President, Sahitya Academy, New Delhi.
National Professor of India in Humanities,
Calcutta, 11-3-71

Pandit Sri S. N. Srirama Desikan, Siromani, Sanskrita Ratna, distinguished scholar and writer of Sanskrit, who is equally erudite in the important Dravidian languages, particularly Tamil and Telugu, has added another feather to his cap by bringing out a translation in Sanskrit prose and verse the writings of Avvaiyar on Ethics. He has shown himself to be a Sanskrit poet who writes with ease and facility and elegance and mellifluousness.
He has also a large number of works on Sanskrit literature and Sanskritic subjects, and he has been serving the cause of Sanskrit for nearly 30 years Her four works which are current have all been translated by Pandit Sri Srirama Desikan in the present little book.
1. Altichudi 2. Kondrai-Venthan 3. Muthural 4. Nalvazhi, the last two reminding one of the very abundant Spruce poetry of Snskrit which is some times of high literary beauty, like for example the Niti-Sataka of Bhartruhari. Those who do not read Tamil but are more or less at home with Sanskrit will certainly feel happy at receiving these new gifts from the hands of a versatile scholar of Sanskrit and of South Indian languages of the present day, like Pandit S. N. Sri Rama Desikan, Siromani.

SRI SRI PRAKASA,
Raj Bhavan,
Governor of Bombay,
March 30, 1957.


Pandit S. N. Srirama Desikan was very well known to me when I was Governor of Madras. I was much struck by the fluency with which he spoke Sanskrit and the knowledge he had of its literature. It was always a pleasure to meet him and to realise how with a little effort, Sanskrit though regarded a very difficult language, can be mastered and used with comparative ease.
I had also the pleasure of introducing him to the President, Dr. Rajendra Prasad and the Governor of Uttar Pradesh, Shri K. M. Munshi, who were both much pleased to meet him and to know of his attainments.


V. V. GIRl,
Governor of Kerala,
April 19, 1961.

I have known Shri Sreerama Desikan for a long time. He is a great Sanskrit scholar. He is rendering great service to the country by his works and publications. There are only a few Sanskrit scholars of this type in the country.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Photo Gallery
SN Sri Rama Desikan
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Shri Rajaji - Kamba Ramayanam Translation
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Sanskrit translation of Vemana Padyamulu - Shri V.V.Giri
Sanskrit Translation of Bharathiyar Works
valluvar vizha
submitting of ayur veda book
kalaimamani title
With wife
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Ahobila Mutt - Music Festival
Ananthasayanam Iyengar - Avvaiyar Nithi Works
Andavan Ashram
Ayur Veda Bharathi from HH Kanchi Kamakoti Peetathipathi Jagatguru Shri Jeyendra Saraswathi Swamigal
H.H. Shri Sringeri Saradha Peetam Jagatguru Bharatitheertha Sankaracharya Swamigal - Naladiyar Sanskrit Translation
Kalaimani Title from Dr. Jayalalitha
Kambaramayanam - Bala Kandam Translation shawl by Shri Rajaji
Mr. Morarji Desai - Thirukural Sanskrit translation
Naaladiyar Sanskrit Translation works
Pattupattu Translation
Receiving gold medal
S.N.Sriramadesikan 8
S.N.Sriramadesikan 9
S.N.Sriramadesikan10
S.N.Sriramadesikan 12
Sanskrit Scholar - Sri Anantasayanam Iyengar
Sanskrit Scholar by Shri V V Giri
submitting a Ayur Veda tamil Translation to the Honourable Chief Minister Dr. M. G. Ramachandran
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